Secure shopping

MP3, WAV, FLAC

Juno Download offers over 3 million dance tracks in MP3, WAV & FLAC formats, featuring genre pages, advanced audioplayer, super-fast download speeds.

Visit Juno Download

Secure shopping

Studio equipment

Our full range of studio equipment from all the leading equipment and software brands. Guaranteed fast delivery and low prices.

Visit Juno Studio

Secure shopping

DJ equipment

Our full range of DJ equipment from all the leading equipment and software brands. Guaranteed fast delivery and low prices. Visit Juno DJ

Secure shopping

Vinyl & CDs

The world's largest dance music store featuring the most comprehensive selection of new and back catalogue dance music Vinyl and CDs online.

Visit Juno Records

Dan Lissvik – Midnight

When former Studio man Dan Lissvik released his first solo material following the band’s break-up, he still seemed in mourning for their passing. Although 2014’s Meditation arrived two years after he officially parted ways with Studio partner Rasmus Hagg, it felt like a heartfelt tribute to a 10-year partnership gone awry. It opened with “An Ode To Studio” (complete with tear-jerking pianos), before sauntering through tracks that felt like they could have formed part of the duo’s brilliant – and critically acclaimed – 2006 debut album, West Coast. The band’s trademarks – glistening electric and acoustic guitars, languid dub basslines, freshly baked textures, space disco synths and krautrock style rhythmic hypnotism – were all present and correct. It was great, of course, but he’d clearly not moved on.

Read the rest of this entry »

Huerco S. – For Those Of You Who Have Never (And Also Those Who Have)

When Brian Leeds first emerged as a producer, his voice was just one of many lumped within the outsider house scene. The atmospheric club abstractions of Huerco S were strikingly emotive but not wholly unique. As the dust settled over the lo-fi scene it was unclear where he would go. Yet where others faltered, Leeds’ star rose. As the years passed his style grew more distinctive and defied easy categorisation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Floorplan – Victorious

No other electronic music artist has undergone such radical transformation in recent years as Robert Hood. From the creator of minimal techno and the author of its benchmark works, like Minimal Nation to the Floorplan project which honours the Creator, the Detroit artist has developed in an unpredictable manner. It appears that this shift has been as a result of changes in Hood’s personal life, which include him moving to a rural part of the States and becoming more actively involved in his church.

Read the rest of this entry »

Rhythmic Theory – Circulation

The opening track of Rhythmic Theory’s debut album, Circulation, could well soundtrack a spacecraft touching down on an uncharted planet in a sci-fi film. Hazy ambient textures resonate absorbingly throughout “Intro (to my imagination)” but with a touch of trepidation, and a distorted voice adds to the almost fraught sense of intrigue. It invites listeners into the world the elusive Bristol-based artist constructs over the course of Circulation, his longest and most fully-formed work yet.

Read the rest of this entry »

Wolf Müller & Cass. – The Sound Of Glades

Since launching last year, International Feel’s horizontally inclined mini-album series has delivered two of the ambient revival’s most enjoyable moments. They were notably different beasts, Len Leise dived head-first into woozy, new age waters, while CFCF popped down the beach to watch a Balearic sunset in the company of guitarists, accordion players and an under-used percussionist. But both proved the magical, life affirming qualities of the best ambient music. Given that the style is often clumsily mishandled – see Sasha’s recent soul-sapping effort on Late Night Tales, for starters – it’s heartening to see International Feel’s series start in such confident and assured fashion.

Read the rest of this entry »

Abul Mogard – Works

TWAJ-590

Electronic music’s brief history is full of entertaining myths and urban legends. From the one about Derrick May sitting in his apartment naked in tears after writing Strings of Life to the one about Aphex Twin playing a piece of sandpaper in a DJ set, the music’s largely instrumental, abstract structure requires additional story-telling to provide some background.

Read the rest of this entry »

Zahgurim – Moral Rearmament

Zahgurim was a short-lived ‘80s band, established by Paul Ackerley and William Vince. Together they released just one album, Moral Rearmament, before the founders focused on other projects. Mannequin, the label of choice for anyone with even a passing interest in wave and industrial curiosities, has now decided to shine a light on this fleeting but fascinating project. The modern audience’s senses are so overloaded with ‘artists’ – and in this context that word is fully deserving of the quotation marks – pedalling their team’s marketing tactics on social media that we tend to forget just how shocking and outright seditious music can be.

Read the rest of this entry »

Various Artists – Versatile 1996-2006

In early 1996, during the midst of Paris’ infamous – and much-chronicled – “French Touch” revolution, a budding DJ/producer from the local party scene, Gilbert “Gilb’r” Cohen, decided to launch his own label. While the imprint’s first two releases would stick rigidly to the filtered, disco-heavy house style dominating Parisian dancefloors at the time, it wouldn’t be long before Cohen’s label would begin living up to its’ name: Versatile Records. In the two decades since, Cohen’s imprint has remained deliriously difficult to pin down.

Read the rest of this entry »

Studio OST – Scenes 2012-2015

It still feels like reasonably early days for the assorted members of the White Material world, and yet between them they release music that shortcuts the growing pains that used to be a necessary part of maturing as an artist in the public eye. Take DJ Richard and his debut album Grind, released to rapturous acclaim last year on Dial. His first 12” only came out in 2012, and there is but one other record to his name thus far in his career, and yet the contents of his musical arsenal speak of a considered, mature approach you would expect of someone much longer in the tooth.

Read the rest of this entry »

Horsepower Productions – Crooks Crime & Corruption

Horsepower Productions are widely thought to have played the biggest part in the creation of dubstep. It’s always been a difficult fact to take in properly, in that their ramshackle dub-garage constructions from the early noughties, imbued with the sample sense of classic hip hop, was and still is so unique. Rhythm exercises like “Fat Larry’s Skank” had a lean, strident momentum in the dialogue between beat and sub bass, while the macro format of each song had a meandering quality unheard of in garage, with spliffed-out non-sequiturs and stop-start distraction.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ibrahim Alfa – Hidden By The Leaves

Let’s face it – a lot of the stories behind practitioners of electronic music can be fairly dry. Secure home environments, steady education, and family support with which to indulge creative whims before hitting upon success of one kind or another. Of course it’s not always like that, as Joe Muggs pointed out when he wrote a wildly twisting story of ‘90s techno, crime and punishment on the South coast of England for Thump, shining a light on the lesser-known talents of Ibrahim Alfa.

Read the rest of this entry »

Der Zyklus – Renormalon

There is a wonderful story about Derrick May playing a record full of typewriter sounds for 20 minutes during the peak time at a leading London nightclub one night during the early ’90s. Faced with an onslaught of arhythmic abstract sounds, the vast majority of those present decided to tough it out and wait patiently (although quite possibly doing this with rolling eyes and independently mobile jaws) until the eventual denouement when track dropped back in.

Read the rest of this entry »

Albert Van Abbe – Champagne Palestine

It has taken Albert Van Abbe fifteen years to put out his debut album, but it’s been worth the wait. The Dutch producer has always approached techno with one ear in tune with the dance floor and the other focused on experimentation, and Champagne Palestine is no exception. Van Abbe’s concept for the album revolves around a dream-like story that unfolds in the Middle East, but the listener shouldn’t let this narrative get in the way of what is a fine, experimental techno album.

Read the rest of this entry »

TM404 – Acidub

As the rush of rediscovered excitement around hardware practices settles to a steady hum, it feels like there is a growing acceptance that it really is OK to use any tools you like to make your music; it’s the content that counts. That won’t stop people having their preferred workflows and waxing lyrical about them, but at least now the analogue dogma can resign to the same redundant pocket of hype-driven chest-beating that laptop-jockeying digital evangelists adopted once DAWs and plug-ins could stand up to the capabilities of drum machines and synthesisers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Spike – Orange Cloud Version

Remix albums have long been an established part of dance music culture, with roots stretching back to the instrumental dub albums of the 1970s, and the post-disco dancefloor collections of the early ‘80s. Over the years, the format has given us some genuine gems – Imagination’s Night Dubbing, Gwen Guthrie’s Padlock, The League Unlimited Orchestra’s Love & Dancing, and Massive Attack’s No Protection, to name four that quickly spring to mind – but also some badly conceived fluff. For every well thought out set full of brilliantly inventive but respectful revisions, there are ten or more collections designed primarily with sales and marketing in mind.

Read the rest of this entry »

Kane Ikin – Modern Pressure

While we may be living in a time of plenty for experimental music, it’s easy to forget in the surge of snarling overtones and lo-fi charms what wonders can be communicated through truly pristine production. Sometimes the notion of clear, well-mixed and detailed production can be mistaken for a lack of soul, and in some cases that might be right. It’s hard to get a thrill out of anodyne music-by-numbers fashioned out of a collection of vanilla sounds, but equally signal chain grit and leaning heavy on the gains isn’t a shortcut to creative excellence.

Read the rest of this entry »

IORI – Cold Radiance

Hailing from Okinawa, now-Tokyo-based producer IORI once cut his teeth as an assistant for David Mancuso’s revered party, The Loft, in New York City, where he learnt a meticulous sonic mentality from his audiophile mentor. This permeates his carefully-handled arrangements, which have helped make his name and define a series of spacey, atmospheric originals and remixes for proponent imprints like Phonica and Prologue to name but a few. Two years after his floor-focused, full-bodied contributions to the Collection compilation, he makes a return to Field with his second album Cold Radiance, throwing himself into an almost beatless excursion. It is an answer to the Dutch label, which called for IORI to explore his experimental and ambient side.

Read the rest of this entry »

Max D – Boost

It may have been three years since Andrew Field-Pickering’s last full-length excursion, the RVNG-released Woo, but the Washington D.C-based producer could hardly be accused of slacking. In that time, he’s released a series of 12” singles expanding on his now familiar skewed, new age-influenced, leftfield house template. These have included a dash of sweaty, rave and jungle-influenced madness for Hot Haus (“Highlife”), an EP of out-there ambient jazz for The Trilogy Tapes, another collection of fizzing drum machine jams under the Dolo Percussion alias, a deep and picturesque broken beat excursion on Berceuse Heroique, and a typically eccentric, Detroit techno influenced outing for Off Minor. As if that wasn’t enough, he also found time to explore experimental electronica, jazz and ambience for PAN as band leader of the acclaimed Lifted collective.

Read the rest of this entry »

Sam Kidel – Disruptive Muzak

During the late 1940s and early ‘50s, America’s Muzak Corporation established a program known as “Stimulus Progression”. Rather creepily, this existed to develop music designed to alter behaviour, be it enticing shoppers into longer, slower browsing sessions, or making factory workers more productive. While the “Stimulus Progression” program was abandoned decades ago, its’ principles continue to drive the development of piped mood music.

Read the rest of this entry »

Trux – Trux

It’s hard enough keeping up with latest developments of your umpteen favourite artists and labels and collectives and scenes and sub genres and so forth, without even batting an eyelid at the more ambiguous or downright anonymous entrants into the great unending modern music surge. A casual pause for thought about the amount of hot new shit by first time artists coming out on little known labels is enough to send a devoted music lover into a mouth-frothing frenzy, haunted by the thought of that cult pressing being snapped up by perma-connected internet seekers, soon to be an ultra-rare classic of rarified perfection.

Read the rest of this entry »

Older articles